An Unusual But Valuable LinkedIn Search: Content

Most people don’t realize that they can search for content on LinkedIn, but here are four good reasons why you might want to start:

1) you are doing research on a topic.

2) you want to see if other people are writing about, have recently written about, or have covered an aspect of a topic you are thinking of writing about.

3) you are looking for prospects and this is the type of thing they would be reading and commenting on.

4) you want to see if your competitors are writing about a topic.

All you need to do is to type the word or expression in the search bar, click enter and then click on “posts”

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If you use an expression, put quotation marks around it. For example, if you want to look for people writing about genome sequencing, search for “genome sequencing”, as the quotation marks tell Linkedin to look for those two words together. Without the quotation marks, LinkedIn will look for the two words, but not necessarily together.

And a word about hashtags: not everyone uses them, so I usually don’t search for them. I think I got better results from “genome sequencing” than from #genomesequencing.

Try it. Once you have tried it a couple times, you will start thinking of ways to use it to your advantage.

The obligatory disclaimer: I do not work for or have any association with LinkedIn, other than being a user who pays them for his Sales Navigator subscription every month. For some reason LinkedIn gave me early access to the LinkedIn Newsletter. I have no idea why, but thanks for reading.

Want more like this? (the newsletter I mean, not the disclaimer) I publish a weekly email newsletter on using LinkedIn effectively for Sales and Marketing. Each newsletter typically contains three articles like the one above, it’s free, and you can unsubscribe anytime. Here’s a link to the sign up page: https://practicalsmm.com/contact/

How I Increased My LinkedIn Message Response Rates

Anyone home? (photo courtesy Mark Johnston)

A simple idea that improved (as in quintupled) my response rates to messages on LinkedIn. It can for you too.

So you are sending outreach messages on LinkedIn and your response rate is abysmal. See if you do any of the following in order to improve your situation:

1. Improve your message writing skills

2. Change your call to action at the end

3. Work on improving your subject lines

4. Try sending your messages at different times of the day

5. And different days of the week

6. Throw money at the problem

May I suggest that before you do anything else you should check to make sure that the person you are trying to contact actually sees value in LinkedIn and uses it regularly.

Let’s say I find someone who nominally fits my customer demographic. I check their profile and here is what I see:

  • They have something like 122 connections.
  • And no activity.
  • No meat in their experience sections, just company, title and years worked there, in other words, the bare bones.
  • They have eight skills listed, each of which has been endorsed by three or four people.

I can see that this person places little value in LinkedIn as a work tool, and that they likely come around every couple months…or less often than that.

It doesn’t matter how good my message may be. If the other person is not there to see it, how can I hope for a response?

The last statistic I saw said that sixty percent of LinkedIn users show up less than once a month. So what percentage use LinkedIn at least once every two weeks? Twenty?

My point is that sending a message to someone who will next come around to LinkedIn around Thanksgiving is not a recipe for success. And my guess is that someone who doesn’t see any value in coming around to LinkedIn that often is not going to carefully go through all the messages and notifications that have piled up since the last time they were here. So my goal is to identify that unresponsive crowd and avoid sending them messages on LinkedIn. For those people I will try introductions or referrals (via email), or Twitter, or cold calls for that matter.

One of the advantages of LinkedIn is you can get a fair idea of who the regular users are – you can see lots of connections or followers, you can see if they are active, and you can see if they have a completed profile with things like lots of recommendations and endorsements. When I send a message to someone who fits in this category I can feel confident that they will see my message, and because they are a regular LinkedIn user who sees value in LinkedIn, at least give me a fair hearing.

Not hard to do. Doesn’t cost a pile of money. And can increase the number of responses you get by two to five times.

The obligatory disclaimer: I do not work for or have any association with LinkedIn, other than being a user who pays them for his Sales Navigator subscription every month. For some reason LinkedIn gave me early access to the LinkedIn Newsletter. I have no idea why, but I am very thankful, especially as this feature’s rollout speed could, at its kindest, be called “stately.”

I publish a weekly email newsletter on using LinkedIn effectively for Sales and Marketing. Each newsletter typically contains two to four articles, it’s free, and you can unsubscribe anytime. Here’s a link to the sign up page: https://practicalsmm.com/contact/

Well, What Is In It For Them, Anyway?

As I am always going on about, “it’s not about you, it’s about them” in your interactions with others on LinkedIn – especially in connecting and outreach – it was only a matter of time before I got asked this.

I had someone ask me this the other week. They were sending connection requests to prospective customers and they were having a tough time coming up with a good reason for the person to connect with them.

To their credit, they were honest with me in describing the situation. “I want business from them, so this is kind of a one way street. What can I offer them?”

This is what happens when we have the blinders on. We see something we want – in this case a connection to a hot prospect – and all we can see is what that will do for us. It blinds us to the other person’s perspective and their problems, wants and needs.

There are three things you can offer the person you are connecting with.

1) Your knowledge. Everyone seems to forget this. You spend every hour of every day helping people like your prospect solve the problem they have. This is what you do. While it may be a new and novel situation for them, it’s something you see all the time. They are the person looking online for the recipe for a dinner dish, while you’re a chef who cooks twenty of those every night.

2) Your experience with their industry. This is different from your knowledge in that you are putting the knowledge into practice in different situations. This is important because your past experience solving problems like the ones they have will reassure them that you are someone worthwhile they should know.

3) Lastly, you have something that is uniquely LinkedIn: your network of connections. And this applies to most anyone you meet on LinkedIn. If you have any size network at all you have the ability to introduce or refer this new person to someone they want to know. Need help with CRM? I have connections who work for CRM companies, I have connections who are independent CRM consultants, and ones that are CRM power users. People in similar positions to themselves? No problem. Suppliers? Got you covered.

Access to your network is actually a pretty powerful thing to be able to offer.

Your job in making your request to connect or in sending an outreach message for that matter, is to show the recipient that the potential benefits of responding are compelling.

Obligatory boilerplate: I do not work for or have any association with LinkedIn, other than being a user who pays them for his Sales Navigator subscription every month. But I was an early subscriber to Sales Navigator and have a grandfathered subscription where I pay a lot less than I should. Don’t tell LinkedIn. Thanks.

Want more like this? (the newsletter I mean, not the disclaimer) I publish a weekly email newsletter on using LinkedIn effectively for Sales and Marketing. Each newsletter typically contains two to four articles, it’s free, and you can unsubscribe anytime. Here’s a link to the sign up page: https://practicalsmm.com/contact/