LinkedIn User Interface Problems: Possible Causes and Fixes

In the first quarter of 2017 LinkedIn released an updated version of the desktop user interface. This caused a blizzard of user interface bugs and hiccups. After getting multiple requests every day over a two or three week period, I wrote an article on possible user interface problem causes and fixes.

For whatever reason, I am receiving an uptick in requests for help with desktop user interface issues again lately, so I thought I would dust that old article off, update it and get it out there.

A lot of these problems are fixable or can be worked around, and doing so is pretty easy. 

There are four possible reasons you may be experiencing problems with the new LinkedIn Desktop User Interface:

You may just be experiencing a “glitch”

That’s a bug or problem with the User Interface that is affecting only you in your current session on LinkedIn. In particular, these types of bugs manifest themselves as missing information or missing features on your pages. And these happen a lot.

Solution: Log off LinkedIn. Clear your browser cache and log back in. Sometimes it is necessary to reboot your computer. I use Google Chrome and I find that once I reach 300Mb of history and assorted junk in my browser cache, anomalies start showing up on LinkedIn. I was working with a client and he kept getting the “it’s not you, it’s us, try again” message when he wanted to do a LinkedIn search. It turned out he had 700Mb of odds and ends in his browser cache. Cleaning the browser cache fixed the problem.

You have a problem or problems specific to your Browser

There seem to be a lot of issues with different browsers. I am not a browser or operating system expert, but it is apparent that some of the bugs and oddities users experience are caused by browsers not working properly with LinkedIn.

Solution: try doing the same thing you are having a problem with but using a different browser. If you use Internet Explorer, try Chrome. If you use Safari, try Firefox. This will indicate if the problem is specific to the browser you use. I have had connections tell me that LinkedIn support suggested they “upgrade to the latest version of Chrome.” If you can tell it is a browser problem, but confirming that your browser is up to date, you have what should be a known bug and it is time to try LinkedIn tech support. See the bottom of this article.

You are part of some weird LinkedIn user experiment

You are minding your own business when some new feature or graphic appears that wasn’t there before. It’s pretty neat and you think “this is smart” but no announcement has been made and no one seems to be talking about it. Congratulations, you are likely a guinea pig, a test subject for a new feature. One day soon the feature will go away, with the same zero fanfare with which it showed up in the first place.

Solution: Pray. If you thought it was a good idea, pray LinkedIn makes it a regular feature. And pray that LinkedIn doesn’t think it’s so good an idea that they make it a premium pay-for feature.

LinkedIn may have changed the way something works or removed a feature

Well, there isn’t anything you can do about this except confirm that the the feature has changed or disappeared. Most LinkedIn trainers or consultants can usually set you straight on whether a feature is gone or drastically changed (we have one awesome jungle drum network set up). They will often be able to show you a workaround or alternative method of accomplishing what you want to do.

If none of these apply to you or seem to work, it is time to throw in the towel and contact LinkedIn tech support. There is a link to the LinkedIn Help Center in the pull down menu under the Me tab at the top right of any LinkedIn page. Don’t use this. For faster responses to technical problems on LinkedIn, you need to go to…Twitter. I am not kidding. It is much much faster to get help via tweeting to @LinkedInHelp on Twitter than it does using the Help function on LinkedIn itself. But that’s a whole other discussion.