Land Of The Canned: LinkedIn Messages That Are Wearing Thin

One of the great incongruities with the idea of social selling is the volume of messages that people wind up sending. Instead of cold calling a hundred people  once, it becomes a hundred people to monitor, share content with, comment on and send messages to.

To be social you need lots of engagement.

But lots of engagement sounds like a lot of work.

Enter the mass messaging.

Which sounds great. Come up with a message and send it to a hundred people.

But there are two problems with the mass messaging approach: zero customization and zero personalization. I receive messages all the time offering to help me…with my LinkedIn skills…or publish content on LinkedIn…or generate sales leads. It is apparent that these people didn’t bother looking at my profile, and that I was just one of a large number of people sent this same message.

Let me see if I can put this politely:

Actually reading the profile of someone you want to send a message to may seem like a lot of work, but there is a lot to be said for not looking like an idiot.

Not that polite? Sorry.

You wind up receiving messages like this: “I see you looked at my profile and based on your fascinating background I think we should connect.“ (this was an actual message a friend received a few weeks ago).

So what you have are irrelevant messages apparently being sent to a large number of recipients who didn’t request them. And that, ladies and gentlemen, is what we call spam. So while people sending these messages may think they are being brilliant social sellers, they are actually closer to pond scum.

The worst part with this type of  messaging is the apparent contempt of the sender for the recipient. That’s what really grinds me the most. Your assumption that I will be flattered and stupid enough to fall for it.

The solution? Customization and personalization. For each person. And each message. The operative word is “person.”

And the people that send me those sad little boilerplate messages? I always respond courteously and thank them for my interest, point out that reading my profile would have saved them the effort, and wish them success in their next job.

The LinkedIn Secret Ingredient: Introductions

This is the “You don’t need a Sales Navigator or Premium LinkedIn account” strategy.

If you have 500 LinkedIn connections and those connections have 500 connections each, you have 250,000 second degree connections. A lot of them are going to be people you would like to connect with.

Want proof? Go take a company that you would like to get more deeply into and search for it. Choose “people” as the result. Now select just your second level connections. What you will probably find is that while you don’t have a “two” that is THE person you would like to meet, you have multiple pathways into the company.

So turn your connections into your ambassadors and ask them to introduce you to people they know at those target companies.

I know what a lot of people will be saying: I have 1500 connections but I really don’t know them all that well, maybe only 300 of them. Fine. Just work with the 300. If they have 300 connections each that’s 90,000 people they can introduce you to.  

What does an introduction take?

“A this is B, this is how I know B. B has some unique insights into the widgets.”  

“B this is A, this is how I know A. A has been in the abracadabra industry for fifteen years.”

That’s it. This isn’t rocket science.

Here’s why introductions are huge: Credibility.

The introducer bestows upon you credibility with the other person. It is just a sheen of credibility, a starter kit of credibility, but it gives you you a shot at making  an impression. You don’t get this credibility boost via InMail, email, or cold call.

What an introduction on LinkedIn decodes as is “This is someone I know. He or she is not going to waste your time.”

By the way, this is one of the reasons I try and have an introductory call with my new connections: I want them to know me a little better and have them comfortable with the idea that I may ask them for an introduction, and that I welcome them asking me for an introduction to someone in my network. They can feel comfortable that if they introduce me to a third party that I won’t be wasting the third party’s time and I won’t be saying anything that may damage the credibility of the person that introduced me.

And the secret to making this strategy work? Offer to do it for your connections first. Then when they ask you for an introduction, follow through for them. It’s a variation on “give to get”.  

 

Outreach On LinkedIn: The Things They Don’t Want And The One Thing They Do

Pretty simple message: When you reach out to someone new on LinkedIn here are some of the things they don’t want to hear about:

  • Your company’s latest product improvements
  • Your need for a sales meeting with them
  • Your company’s new service
  • Your need to get them on the phone
  • That you are the #1 sales person or #1 anything else
  • Any other fabulously self-congratulatory achievement, even when you think you have disguised it by saying something like “I was surprised and humbled to receive the Nobel Prize for sales this week…”

All of these translate into you and what you want. Well, what about what they want? And what they really want is:

Information that helps them to make better decisions.

Give them information that will help them make better decisions with the problems they face and those other things that you want will take care of themselves.