Keeping Your LinkedIn Network Healthy

You may have five hundred connections. You may have five thousand connections. But regardless of the number, your network should be tended to from time to time to keep it healthy. You built it to serve your purposes, and now that it is built, you have to keep it from getting unruly and out of control.

Think of your own network. There are probably times you have suffered from “connector’s regret.”

4 signs your LinkedIn network could use some pruning

You find someone on LinkedIn you would really like to meet, and seeing that they are a second degree connection, you are looking for an introduction. And then you see who is the first degree connection you will be asking to make that introduction  and it is someone you have never talked with or even exchanged messages with since you first connected with them over a year ago. And you can see they are not active on LinkedIn. If you find five people that could introduce you and they are all no good, you have a real problem.

Or you see a lot of odd people that seemingly make no sense in the “People You May Know” section. Gee, why am I getting all these people from Spain? Maybe because I just accepted the connection requests of a bunch of people in Spain. LinkedIn is just trying to help. And LinkedIn is helping by in effect asking me, “What’s with all the Spanish connections?”  

Do you suffer from low grade annoyance at your homepage feed? You see connections posting inane things and even worse, connections who comment and like inane things, clogging up your home page with worthless drivel. If you are constantly seeing this junk in your homepage feed, you have a problem. And it is kind of a problem you created because you connected with these people. If the sponsored content on your homepage is starting to look good to you, you know it is time to take action.

Then there are the people that you connect with but have never responded to one of your messages. I am a big fan of being optimistic in my connecting, but if you are going to just sit there like the monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey, you are testing my optimism.

And course there are the people who connect with you and decide that you should be the recipient of a “special offer.”  You shouldn’t be suffering from people who treat their connections like an email list, fishing for customers and referrals with what are obviously form letters. I got a message last month from a connection offering to teach me the secret to LinkedIn. I was tempted to respond “I already know the secret to LinkedIn. It’s Don’t spam your connections with canned messages”.  

What you can and should do about an unruly LinkedIn network

For posts that annoy you: hide this post

Use the “three dot” drop down menu at the top right of the post and choose “Hide this post.” This works well for posts that are getting lots of comments and keep re-showing up in your homepage feed.

For posters that annoy you: unfollow them

From the same drop down menu, the next selection is “Unfollow”. You will stay connected with the person in question, but their content will be hidden from you. A good option for connections who are “judgmentally challenged” in their homepage activity.

For connections that annoy you: disconnect (ie: Defcon 3)

This option is for those times when the disadvantages such as spam or total unresponsiveness lead you to deciding that disconnecting is your best option. First go to your settings and privacy page, choose the middle tab “privacy” and change Profile Viewing Options to “Anonymous LinkedIn Member”. Now go to the connection in question’s profile, click the 3 dots to the right of their photo and select “remove connection” from the drop down list. LinkedIn does not inform the other person that your connection has been severed, and by being anonymous they won’t see you visited their profile. It’s all very efficient and discrete.  

Your network should be full of people that can help you and are around to do so, and of course you should be ready to offer the same to them. Keep your network clean and effective. 

Clues That A LinkedIn Profile Is A Fake

 

Last week I received an invitation to connect on LinkedIn from the person above. Let’s go over all the clues that this is not a real person:

1) The person has an absurdly low number of connections. Actually she had one when she invited me to connect, and had added a second before I could take this screen capture. This is a classic case of a profile not passing the smell test. Human Resources people use LinkedIn more than any other occupation. According to this person’s school and work history, they have been employed full time for four years. How many HR people on LinkedIn do you know with two connections?

2) Someone who is in human resources in Brazil would logically want to connect with people in, I don’t know…maybe Brazil? Nope. This person immediately figured in order to advance her career in HR in Brazil that a person in Toronto was the optimal person to connect with.

3) It almost goes without saying that the invitation to connect did not include a personalized note.

By the way, LinkedIn deserves all the credit in the world for this: within one hour of my reporting this person their profile had been removed by LinkedIn. The downside is that I didn’t have enough time to get a screen cap of her experience sections….

4) Fourth indicator that this was a fake?No job descriptions, just a listing. No Summary at all. I am always skeptical of people who want to connect who have really “thin” profiles.

5) Odd time sequences for jobs. Often you will see fake profiles with job dates left out, or apparent full time jobs overlapping (you worked for Oracle and IBM at the same time for a year? That’s impressive.) This is just sloppiness giving them away. In the case of this person’s “current” job, there were no dates at all.

6) In the example above, the photo belongs to someone else. I ran this one through TinEye (a browser extension which will look for a photo on the web) and TinEye showed me this photo being used six times in other places.

7) And does anyone else think a field of flowers as a background banner is an interesting choice for an HR professional?

The bottom line? Just look for the incongruities. They are there. Fake profiles often have pieces that by themselves look okay, but when combined together just don’t present a coherent narrative.

Oh, and the last reason I knew this was a fake? It’s a bit of a cheat but….

8) The young lady in question says she got an undergrad degree in HR at the University of Sao Paulo, and then she traveled to Canada and got a Masters degree at Upper Canada College. In what can only be an incredible coincidence, I also attended Upper Canada College.

It was my high school.

Stay safe out there.

Making The Connect First Strategy Work For You On LinkedIn

(I asked that new connection to call me after lunch…)   Photo courtesy Mark Johnston

LinkedIn users appear a lot more open to connecting than they were a couple of years ago. So a lot of people are bypassing getting introduced or using InMails and just flat out inviting people they would like to be connected with to connect.

There is a possible downside to this approach though. On the LinkedIn help area it says, “If you’ve sent a large number of invitations, your account may be limited from inviting more members. This is generally due to many of your invitations being rejected or ignored by the members you’ve invited.” But for the most part, people seem to be more accepting of connection requests these days. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that I am hearing from a lot of people that their new connections are unresponsive. They ask for a phone call: no response. They send a message.  Silence. So they ask me for suggestions. I always wind up asking them why they think the new connection should respond.

“Because we are connected.”

Ah, now we’re getting somewhere. They assume that being connected conveys privileged status to them and that the new connections will want to respond to them. They are half right. Being connected has privileges, primarily that you can send each other messages. But neither one of you has to respond.  

The reason that these people are not getting responses is simple: they have little or no credibility with the other party. If you are going to ask for someone’s  attention, they had better feel up front that you are worth paying attention to. And that’s the problem with most blind connection requests. They often result in a connection, but you haven’t established your credibility or possible value to the other party. That still needs to be accomplished.  

So what can you do? Well, you need to figure out how you can build credibility with this person. What do they want? What problems do they have? How can you show them that you have answers to those problems? Show them your value. This can be in sending them information they can use (I understand your problems) or in offering assistance they can use (I can help with your problems).

People will talk to you once they think it is worth their while talking to you.