Connecting on LinkedIn Is Easy: The Real Work Comes After Connecting

This past couple of weeks I have had conversations with three connections of mine bemoaning the fact that their connections are unresponsive. They send messages and get no replies. What gives? What are they doing wrong?

Usually, it’s nothing. These folks are smart enough to know not to be spamming their connections with sales pitches and they are not be wasting their time sending messages to people who rarely use LinkedIn.  

What they are doing isn’t really wrong, it’s just ineffective by itself. What they are suffering from is a mismatch between what their idea of a “connection  relationship” is, and their connection’s idea of the same.

Over the past twelve to eighteen months a lot of LinkedIn users have gone from what I think of as “tight” LinkedIn networks – connections that they really do know well, or at least are in their industry – to connecting more freely and widely. I am not sure why this is, but the results are LinkedIn connections who have gone from active relationships to “maybe we will need each other’s help at some point.”

The result? You may be connected to some really good people, but you don’t have a relationship with them. And you shouldn’t assume that they think because you are now connected that you do, right now, have a relationship.  

So where does that leave you? Well it leaves you doing all the work you used to do in order to get someone to connect with you, except you are now doing this work after you are connected. You have to get on their radar and establish your credibility. Here are four ways you can do so.

Be visible, be active. Show them your value by publishing and commenting on LinkedIn. One of the advantages of being connected is that your activity has a greater chance of being seen by a connection than a non-connection.  

Be there when they are visible or active. If they comment, share or publish content on LinkedIn, comment on it, like it or reshare it. This increases your visibility, and they should appreciate your engagement.

Share content specifically with them. Show that you are thinking of what their problems are and that you are a possible resource.

And keep sending them the odd message, with an emphasis on what you have to offer.

Finally, recognize that not everybody you connect with shares your idea of what a connected relationship should be. There are people who don’t see or use LinkedIn the same way you do. Let them go and move on to the people that are on the same LinkedIn wavelength that you are.  

 

Calculating Whether LinkedIn Articles Or LinkedIn Posts Work Better For You

As most people who write and publish on LinkedIn know by now, views are counted differently for LinkedIn articles and updates. Many people get hung up trying to figure out how many update views equal an article view in order to decide which is a better use of their writing time.

I have tried this myself and it is awkward and unwieldy at best. May I suggest that you forget the number of views and instead you just look at the relative number of engagements you get from something you have published. Find an article and an update on similar topics. Then ask yourself:

Which brought more engagement?

Which had better quality engagement?

I did this a few weeks ago for an article I published on Tuesday March 27th (What Does It Mean When Someone “Views” Your Article Or Post On LinkedIn?) and a post I published the next day (The major difference between LinkedIn Articles and Posts: how views are counted) on the same topic.

The article received 1250 views with 26 comments, 74 likes and 12 reshares.

Meanwhile, the post the next day received 6,700 views but only 16 comments, 34 likes and 5 reshares

So the post got almost seven times as many views as the article, but only half the engagement. The quality of engagement was high in both post and article. So in this example, the article would seem to be a better vehicle at generating engagement for me than the post.

But of course, there’s more to it than that.

Articles take me a while to write, posts are quick, like one quarter the time an article takes. Advantage: posts.   

Articles have a long tail that I have not seen from posts. I receive notifications about comments, likes and shares on articles that are two years old. I get notifications about comments on months old posts every day. People are still clicking on the article above (55 times in the last couple of days) while the post seems to have faded away.  Advantage: articles

My original question asked how you could calculate which was better. The answer, as with many facets of LinkedIn is: It’s complicated. I suggest experimenting with both articles and posts to see which work better for you. You may find that it is not a case of an article being better than a post or the other way round, but how one can complement the other, resulting in more quality engagement on LinkedIn.

Does Your LinkedIn Activity Generate Engagement?

I define engagement as people reacting to your activity on LinkedIn. They respond with in one or more of what I call the “big five” ways – likes, comments, shares, followers and people who view your profile.

When people engage with you in one these five ways it is possible for you to identify them – which you can’t do with people who view your content. And if you can identify them, you can reach out to them.

And if you are about to complain that your engagement isn’t what it used to be and it’s all LinkedIn fault for strangling the distribution of your content….you’re right. Now get over it. Either pay for sponsored updates, or figure out how to work within LinkedIn’s rules.    

We interrupt this article for a sidebar:

I am always amused by the people who say they don’t use LinkedIn anymore. But while not using LinkedIn anymore, they find the time to be on LinkedIn, come across a post or article, read it, stop to add a comment saying they don’t use LinkedIn any more, and come back repeatedly to argue with anyone who disagrees with them.

My content generates engagement. And when it does I engage right back. It’s a great way to meet new people and develop my LinkedIn network. I meet people that may become customers and just as importantly, I meet people that may refer me to potential customers.  

Writing content that works, whether it be writing articles or posts, is time consuming. Sharing other people’s content, or getting involved in the discussions that revolve around other people’s content, is time consuming. Make sure that that time consumed on LinkedIn is time invested and not just time spent.