What Can You Do About LinkedIn Connections That Don’t Respond?

You know the drill: you connect with someone on LinkedIn, someone you really  feel you are in a position to help professionally and that can help you. You send them a welcome message and…silence. Sometimes they even asked you to connect and sent you a personalized note, you accepted, sent them a message and…silence.

What, if anything can you do about it? Here are five options at your disposal.

One strategy is to just let them be, and see if, over time, they come out of their cone of silence. But let’s be honest, while patience is a virtue, you are not feeling really patient.

Another approach would be to just keep sending them messages. But if someone didn’t respond to your initial post-connection outreach, what makes you think that will change if you keep trying? There’s a fine line between appearing persistent and appearing pathetic.

But if repeated messaging is a low probability strategy what can you do to get their attention?

A third possibility is to post content on LinkedIn, either updates, articles or both. You may get their attention from them seeing your content in their homepage feed. That is one of the privileges of being connected. Your content goes into their feed. They may of may not see it, but that’s a lot better than almost zero percent chance a non-connection has.

Seeing your content can build your credibility with them, which is what you need. Their unresponsiveness so far is a clue you don’t have much credibility right now.

Another method I use is to share content specifically with one person. If you click “share” on a piece of content, one of the options is “send as message” to one or more of your connections. Sharing a piece of content tailored to their work with  (what I hope is) an insightful comment is a way I have found that will get a response and lead to conversations.

Lastly, you can always get a second opinion. The odds are reasonable that you share this new inscrutable connection with one or more of your existing connections. Contact those connections and ask for guidance or their opinions as to what would appeal to this person.

This may seem like a lot of work to go to to just try and open up a conversation with a new connection, but these days many people connect easily but don’t develop relationships as easily. It is your job to establish your credibility and make this person see that you are someone they want to talk to.

You may think that connecting with someone opens the door, but it is best to be prepared for opening the door and finding…another door.

Connecting on LinkedIn Is Easy: The Real Work Comes After Connecting

This past couple of weeks I have had conversations with three connections of mine bemoaning the fact that their connections are unresponsive. They send messages and get no replies. What gives? What are they doing wrong?

Usually, it’s nothing. These folks are smart enough to know not to be spamming their connections with sales pitches and they are not be wasting their time sending messages to people who rarely use LinkedIn.  

What they are doing isn’t really wrong, it’s just ineffective by itself. What they are suffering from is a mismatch between what their idea of a “connection  relationship” is, and their connection’s idea of the same.

Over the past twelve to eighteen months a lot of LinkedIn users have gone from what I think of as “tight” LinkedIn networks – connections that they really do know well, or at least are in their industry – to connecting more freely and widely. I am not sure why this is, but the results are LinkedIn connections who have gone from active relationships to “maybe we will need each other’s help at some point.”

The result? You may be connected to some really good people, but you don’t have a relationship with them. And you shouldn’t assume that they think because you are now connected that you do, right now, have a relationship.  

So where does that leave you? Well it leaves you doing all the work you used to do in order to get someone to connect with you, except you are now doing this work after you are connected. You have to get on their radar and establish your credibility. Here are four ways you can do so.

Be visible, be active. Show them your value by publishing and commenting on LinkedIn. One of the advantages of being connected is that your activity has a greater chance of being seen by a connection than a non-connection.  

Be there when they are visible or active. If they comment, share or publish content on LinkedIn, comment on it, like it or reshare it. This increases your visibility, and they should appreciate your engagement.

Share content specifically with them. Show that you are thinking of what their problems are and that you are a possible resource.

And keep sending them the odd message, with an emphasis on what you have to offer.

Finally, recognize that not everybody you connect with shares your idea of what a connected relationship should be. There are people who don’t see or use LinkedIn the same way you do. Let them go and move on to the people that are on the same LinkedIn wavelength that you are.  

 

Calculating Whether LinkedIn Articles Or LinkedIn Posts Work Better For You

As most people who write and publish on LinkedIn know by now, views are counted differently for LinkedIn articles and updates. Many people get hung up trying to figure out how many update views equal an article view in order to decide which is a better use of their writing time.

I have tried this myself and it is awkward and unwieldy at best. May I suggest that you forget the number of views and instead you just look at the relative number of engagements you get from something you have published. Find an article and an update on similar topics. Then ask yourself:

Which brought more engagement?

Which had better quality engagement?

I did this a few weeks ago for an article I published on Tuesday March 27th (What Does It Mean When Someone “Views” Your Article Or Post On LinkedIn?) and a post I published the next day (The major difference between LinkedIn Articles and Posts: how views are counted) on the same topic.

The article received 1250 views with 26 comments, 74 likes and 12 reshares.

Meanwhile, the post the next day received 6,700 views but only 16 comments, 34 likes and 5 reshares

So the post got almost seven times as many views as the article, but only half the engagement. The quality of engagement was high in both post and article. So in this example, the article would seem to be a better vehicle at generating engagement for me than the post.

But of course, there’s more to it than that.

Articles take me a while to write, posts are quick, like one quarter the time an article takes. Advantage: posts.   

Articles have a long tail that I have not seen from posts. I receive notifications about comments, likes and shares on articles that are two years old. I get notifications about comments on months old posts every day. People are still clicking on the article above (55 times in the last couple of days) while the post seems to have faded away.  Advantage: articles

My original question asked how you could calculate which was better. The answer, as with many facets of LinkedIn is: It’s complicated. I suggest experimenting with both articles and posts to see which work better for you. You may find that it is not a case of an article being better than a post or the other way round, but how one can complement the other, resulting in more quality engagement on LinkedIn.