Some Pro’s and Con’s of “Liking” on LinkedIn

(photo caption: “Yeah, it’s been a long day, maybe I’ll just slap a “like” on this one,” Photo courtesy Mark Johnston)

Everyone “likes” articles, posts, discussions, comments and updates on LinkedIn.  But did you ever stop to think what value that liking has? So I wrote some of my own Pro’s and Con’s down. For the purposes of brevity, I use the term
“article” as a catch all for content.

Pro: Likes are easy

Liking something takes no time at all. Click of a button, done. Which leads me to…

Con: Maybe too easy

I always wonder if likes are too easy – you can pull up an article and the option to like it is right there at the top of the screen before you have even read it.

Pro & Con: The “that’s what I was going to say!” like

You come across an article and what you wanted to say has already been nicely articulated by someone else. So either liking the article or liking that person’s comment is the right thing to do, but you still end up a little frustrated.

Pro: The acknowledgement like

Likes  are often a shorthand for “I agree with you” when they are appended to comments in particular. I use “likes” quite often when people make simple comments on one of my articles.

Con: The value add factor is low for likes

When you like an article or post, it adds little value for you. You are one of the rather anonymous like crowd. You pale beside the commenters who are adding to the discussion about the article. When I see someone has liked one of my articles, I think “thank you.” When I see someone has commented on my article, I often reply to their comments and occasionally send them a message thanking them for their comment.

Pro: Added visibility

I see many LinkedIn users who seem to employ likes as a visibility strategy. And if kind of works – authors will see those people in the list of people who liked their content. But….

Con: Too many likes look odd

So I look at someone’s activity and see all they do is like posts. No writing, no sharing, no comments, just likes. This tends to make me wonder if this is a real person or a fake profile.  

Con: Smaller opportunity for engagement

When someone comments on my content it gives me something to latch onto, and provides a possible opportunity to start a conversation with that person. Likes are kind of flimsy. I have sent thank you’s to people who have liked my content, but statistically, I can say they are much less likely to become connections.  

I suppose for me it all comes down to:

If you can, comment. If you can’t comment, like.