Clues That A LinkedIn Profile Is A Fake

 

Last week I received an invitation to connect on LinkedIn from the person above. Let’s go over all the clues that this is not a real person:

1) The person has an absurdly low number of connections. Actually she had one when she invited me to connect, and had added a second before I could take this screen capture. This is a classic case of a profile not passing the smell test. Human Resources people use LinkedIn more than any other occupation. According to this person’s school and work history, they have been employed full time for four years. How many HR people on LinkedIn do you know with two connections?

2) Someone who is in human resources in Brazil would logically want to connect with people in, I don’t know…maybe Brazil? Nope. This person immediately figured in order to advance her career in HR in Brazil that a person in Toronto was the optimal person to connect with.

3) It almost goes without saying that the invitation to connect did not include a personalized note.

By the way, LinkedIn deserves all the credit in the world for this: within one hour of my reporting this person their profile had been removed by LinkedIn. The downside is that I didn’t have enough time to get a screen cap of her experience sections….

4) Fourth indicator that this was a fake?No job descriptions, just a listing. No Summary at all. I am always skeptical of people who want to connect who have really “thin” profiles.

5) Odd time sequences for jobs. Often you will see fake profiles with job dates left out, or apparent full time jobs overlapping (you worked for Oracle and IBM at the same time for a year? That’s impressive.) This is just sloppiness giving them away. In the case of this person’s “current” job, there were no dates at all.

6) In the example above, the photo belongs to someone else. I ran this one through TinEye (a browser extension which will look for a photo on the web) and TinEye showed me this photo being used six times in other places.

7) And does anyone else think a field of flowers as a background banner is an interesting choice for an HR professional?

The bottom line? Just look for the incongruities. They are there. Fake profiles often have pieces that by themselves look okay, but when combined together just don’t present a coherent narrative.

Oh, and the last reason I knew this was a fake? It’s a bit of a cheat but….

8) The young lady in question says she got an undergrad degree in HR at the University of Sao Paulo, and then she traveled to Canada and got a Masters degree at Upper Canada College. In what can only be an incredible coincidence, I also attended Upper Canada College.

It was my high school.

Stay safe out there.