Making The Connect First Strategy Work For You On LinkedIn

(I asked that new connection to call me after lunch…)   Photo courtesy Mark Johnston

LinkedIn users appear a lot more open to connecting than they were a couple of years ago. So a lot of people are bypassing getting introduced or using InMails and just flat out inviting people they would like to be connected with to connect.

There is a possible downside to this approach though. On the LinkedIn help area it says, “If you’ve sent a large number of invitations, your account may be limited from inviting more members. This is generally due to many of your invitations being rejected or ignored by the members you’ve invited.” But for the most part, people seem to be more accepting of connection requests these days. That’s the good news.

The bad news is that I am hearing from a lot of people that their new connections are unresponsive. They ask for a phone call: no response. They send a message.  Silence. So they ask me for suggestions. I always wind up asking them why they think the new connection should respond.

“Because we are connected.”

Ah, now we’re getting somewhere. They assume that being connected conveys privileged status to them and that the new connections will want to respond to them. They are half right. Being connected has privileges, primarily that you can send each other messages. But neither one of you has to respond.  

The reason that these people are not getting responses is simple: they have little or no credibility with the other party. If you are going to ask for someone’s  attention, they had better feel up front that you are worth paying attention to. And that’s the problem with most blind connection requests. They often result in a connection, but you haven’t established your credibility or possible value to the other party. That still needs to be accomplished.  

So what can you do? Well, you need to figure out how you can build credibility with this person. What do they want? What problems do they have? How can you show them that you have answers to those problems? Show them your value. This can be in sending them information they can use (I understand your problems) or in offering assistance they can use (I can help with your problems).

People will talk to you once they think it is worth their while talking to you.